In Conversation With | Sarah Spratt

sarah spratt post

TELL ME A LITTLE BIT ABOUT YOURSELF AND YOUR BACKGROUND?
I grew up obsessed with everything strange and beautiful. As a kid I lived in Detroit, which even today is probably one of the strangest big cities in America. It is also FULL of art and music. I would go to concerts, raves, and galleries dreaming of NYC. My friends and I were very DIY we made our own clothes and cut and colored our own hair.  That’s where it all started. Not living in a city that functioned on its own forced you to figure out how to do things for yourself.
I go back once or twice a year. Mostly when it’s not cold.  🙂 The place is full of this really intense energy that makes you feel like you can do anything is possible. But upon coming home I’m also grateful for where I’m at and what NY has given me.

WHAT ELSE INSPIRES YOU?
I get a lot of inspiration from traveling. I love to see the kids on the streets when I travel.  But really it could be anything, a bird, city lights at night, it’s really everywhere. That’s why my eye needs to travel as much as possible. I have pretty greedy eyes.

HOW DID YOU GET STARTED AS A HAIR COLORIST?
I started out designing clothing when I moved here. After I closed down the line I knew I wanted to do hair. I had always done my own and it was something I always loved to do. I wrote to some agencies in NYC and basically offered to work for free till I was good enough to pay. After a year or so I realized I was most at peace when I was working with color. I had met a lot of really talented people upon moving to NY and was lucky enough to have been allowed to learn from so many talented artists from Art + Commerce to Ion Studio where I was first put on the floor as a colorist.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR STYLE OR PROCESS?
I personally have had almost every color on my head. Color is a very personal thing that differs from person to person. There are no rules. Color is like a fingerprint special for that person. The most important thing is to listen to your clients and find a way to work with their idea that can work with their hair. When making natural colors I like for it to be as soft and seamless as possible. I paint everything by hand using balayage technique. I feel that it is one of the only ways to imitate the sun. But if you don’t want to have a natural color I suggest going big and going for extremes.

WHO ARE SOME OF YOUR CLIENTS ?SIT_sarah_spratt-1010088
I don’t think it’s nice to name names but I love showing pictures when I can!

WHAT’S THE MOST DRASTIC HAIR COLOR YOU HAVE EVER DONE?
I worked on the Free the Nipple film and I had to make one of the actresses have roots that faded into white to pink to black. Which wouldn’t have been that hard if I didn’t have to keep everything looking EXACTLY the same for months. Which meant I had to do the color almost once every 2 weeks. That is a lot of colors and roots that had to look like they never moved or faded!

DO YOU EVER CONSULT CLIENTS WHO ARE MAKING A DRASTIC CHANGE BUT NOT IN A GOOD WAY? HOW DO YOU STEER THEM INTO SOMETHING MORE SUITABLE ?
All the time. I try to use lots of gentle conversation. If that doesn’t work I pull the Detroit girl out and get real.

WHO WOULD BE YOUR DREAM CLIENT AND WHAT WOULD YOU DO WITH THEIR HAIR?
Emma Stone. She literally looks amazing in every single hair color. I would love to work on a film with her. Especially if she is red in it. Reds are my favorite.

WHAT’S NEW FOR 2016?
I suppose right now for 2016 I’ve been just planning a wedding!!  🙂

CONGRATULATIONS !!!!


photography and interview by  JJ JIMENEZ